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Sprint 3 Retrospective

At the end of last week, we finally conclude our third sprint in our development process of the LibreFoodPantry, aiming at a deloyable environments so that they all are isolated in their own space. This is also our last sprint so we tried our best to wrap it up as much as possible, so that the team after us can easily pick up from where we left off. We were able to work together more this time, comparing to us having to separately work on our own stuff in the previous sprint. We finally got a working, operational and deployable user interface as well as a fully implemented, buildable and deployable backend system with REST API and mySQL database. We were also able to adapt with the online communication and worked more effectively with each other.List of what we accomplished during the last sprint:       - Successfully integrate Docker into frontend UI and the REST API, allows them to communicate with the existing mySQL container with configurable parameter in config.json file (REST AP…

Learn How You Fail

The pattern that from Apprenticeship Pattern that I read for this week is “Learn How You Fail”. The chapter mainly talks about how to identify our own problem during the development process and seek to fix it in order to get better.
I really like what the author said within the context. Failure is inevitable and people who has never failed would either stay in their comfort zone and avoid going over the boundaries, or they have overlooked and ignore their mistake all along. This holds true to me since I have done multiple personal projects that requires me to constantly make mistake and discover what is needed to be done for even a single line of code to work. It is pretty obvious that errors will push ourselves to find out what works and what does not, give us a space to fully explore the capacity of the technology so that we will not make a same mistake later on. Moving on to the problem, he states that the learning skills may bring us success, but there are weakness and failures s…

Study the Classics

The second pattern for this week Apprenticeship Pattern is “Study the Classics”. I think this one is pretty straight forward, as it states on point that reading and learning what is in the past is as essential as doing so with documents and books in the current generation, as it would allow ourselves to expose to problems that we might rarely see at the moment.
The patterns start out with an extremely interesting problem that a lot of more experienced people in the field would likely to reference a concept from books and area that we might have now idea it exists, but they expect us to know it already, like any other self-respecting software developers. I have not experienced anything thing like this while working as an intern, but I can imagine that it does happens a lot to new developers in the field. The author explains the solution in a very simple way, which is to admit your ignorance, and ask about the concept, how it works, where do they reference it from and add it to our own r…

Concrete Skills

The first pattern in the Apprenticeship Pattern that I read for this week is Concrete Skills. The pattern pretty much talks about skills that are required to be focus on when an apprentice software developer like us start our career. It also lays out a concept, which is to have knowledge about it, does not mean that we can successfully apply it to create a piece of software, and I think that this is crucial to remember.
The pattern starts off by posing a really interesting problem that I think a lot of people, even veteran, are facing I would say, which is having a team, or a company that is not willing to hire someone that will, for sure, not able to not make any contribution to the project, whether it is direct or indirect, and this I think would take away the potential for an individual to learn and maybe even progress himself/herself in the field if it happens to them constantly. As the author starts to explain the solution, which is to acquire and maintain concrete skills, which i…

Confront Your Ignorance

For this week, now that I have read through “Expose Your Ignorance” in the Apprenticeship Patterns, I continue on to read through “Confront Your Ignorance”, as they seem to go hand in hand with each other. To sum up this chapter, it mostly talks about the advantages and disadvantages when taking action to fill up our knowledge once we identified the gap.
The problem posted for this chapter is that while we have a lot of tools and techniques available out there that we can get our hands on, a lot of developers like us do not know where to start and a lot of common things that people know, we are expected to have those knowledge when we start working. I feel like this is the exact current state of a lot of new people who just got into the field and this chapter seems to be important to know about when we get started. The solution that the author presented, which is picking one skill, tool, or technique to actively learn about it, caught me off guard as I would never imagine it to be a si…

Expose Your Ignorance

For this week, I continued reading the Apprenticeship Pattern and the first one that I got into is “Expose Your Ignorance”. To simply explain this pattern, it encourages the readers to basically no being afraid of feeling ignorance and stupid when asking about what we don’t know.
The problem of this chapter is presented with an example of a work environment that requires the developer to be familiar with required with technologies, but we simply just don’t have any idea how to use it. I like how the author says that it happens to everyone because it is true that people can’t know everything and this would let the readers know that it is common, furthermore encourage them to not be afraid and expose their ignorance. With the question of how should one exposing himself/herself to be the most effective, the author gave us one simple solution, which is to show other people that you might not know about it, but you are willing to learn how to do it during the process of delivering software.…

Reflect as you work

For this week Apprenticeship Pattern, I chose to read about “Reflect As You Work”. When I read the title, my first thought is that this habit is pretty necessary, but it should not be too hard to have a chapter dedicated to it and turns out I was entirely wrong about it. The pattern starts with putting out the question of whenever a developer can consider themselves as “experienced” and how would that process be in order to reach that destination. The author then went straight to the point to explain how just reflecting our own work would be a best way for us to gain more experience. He explains several techniques like making a Personal Practice Map, which would involve writing down all the practices that we do during the development process and share with others, and mimic what they do in order to be better in the field. I think this particular technique would greatly help a lot of new developers in the field who does not know what to expect when developing and would end up doing wh…